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Sc-Me-1011-Grey

Price upon request

Sc-Me-1016 A Ivory Grey

Price upon request

Kl MC-1060 Ivory Multi

Price upon request

Sc-Me-1012 Ivory Grey

Price upon request

Kl MC-1161 Ivory Multi

Price upon request

CD-02 MULTI

Price upon request

EM-02 Grey Multi

Price upon request

EM-01 Blue Multi

Price upon request

Ar-02 C Beige Blue

Price upon request

Lt-6(5001,Dp 1450 D)

Price upon request

Sc-Me-1011-Grey

Price upon request

Sc-Me-1011-Grey


Kilims are produced by tightly interweaving the warp and weft strands of the weave to produce a flat surface with no pile. Kilim weaves are tapestry weaves, technically weft-faced plain weaves, that is, the horizontal weft strands are pulled tightly downward so that they hide the vertical warp strands.

When the end of a color boundary is reached, the weft yarn is wound back from the boundary point. Thus, if the boundary of a field is a straight vertical line, a vertical slit forms between the two different color areas where they meet. For this reason, most kilims can be classed as "slit woven" textiles. The slits are beloved by collectors, as they produce very sharp-etched designs, emphasizing the geometry of the weave. Weaving strategies for avoiding slit formation, such as interlocking, produce a more blurred design image.

The weft strands, which carry the visible design and color, are almost always wool, whereas the hidden warp strands can be either wool or cotton. The warp strands are only visible at the ends, where they emerge as the fringe. This fringe is usually tied in bunches, to ensure against loosening or unraveling of the weave.






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Sc-Me-1016 A Ivory Grey

Price upon request

Sc-Me-1016 A Ivory Grey 

Kilims are produced by tightly interweaving the warp and weft strands of the weave to produce a flat surface with no pile. Kilim weaves are tapestry weaves, technically weft-faced plain weaves, that is, the horizontal weft strands are pulled tightly downward so that they hide the vertical warp strands.


When the end of a color boundary is reached, the weft yarn is wound back from the boundary point. Thus, if the boundary of a field is a straight vertical line, a vertical slit forms between the two different color areas where they meet. For this reason, most kilims can be classed as "slit woven" textiles. The slits are beloved by collectors, as they produce very sharp-etched designs, emphasizing the geometry of the weave. Weaving strategies for avoiding slit formation, such as interlocking, produce a more blurred design image.

The weft strands, which carry the visible design and color, are almost always wool, whereas the hidden warp strands can be either wool or cotton. The warp strands are only visible at the ends, where they emerge as the fringe. This fringe is usually tied in bunches, to ensure against loosening or unraveling of the weave.

Learn More

Kl MC-1060 Ivory Multi

Price upon request

Kl MC-1060 Ivory Multi


Kilims are produced by tightly interweaving the warp and weft strands of the weave to produce a flat surface with no pile. Kilim weaves are tapestry weaves, technically weft-faced plain weaves, that is, the horizontal weft strands are pulled tightly downward so that they hide the vertical warp strands.

When the end of a color boundary is reached, the weft yarn is wound back from the boundary point. Thus, if the boundary of a field is a straight vertical line, a vertical slit forms between the two different color areas where they meet. For this reason, most kilims can be classed as "slit woven" textiles. The slits are beloved by collectors, as they produce very sharp-etched designs, emphasizing the geometry of the weave. Weaving strategies for avoiding slit formation, such as interlocking, produce a more blurred design image.

The weft strands, which carry the visible design and color, are almost always wool, whereas the hidden warp strands can be either wool or cotton. The warp strands are only visible at the ends, where they emerge as the fringe. This fringe is usually tied in bunches, to ensure against loosening or unraveling of the weave.







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Sc-Me-1012 Ivory Grey

Price upon request

Sc-Me-1012 Ivory Grey 


Kilims are produced by tightly interweaving the warp and weft strands of the weave to produce a flat surface with no pile. Kilim weaves are tapestry weaves, technically weft-faced plain weaves, that is, the horizontal weft strands are pulled tightly downward so that they hide the vertical warp strands.

When the end of a color boundary is reached, the weft yarn is wound back from the boundary point. Thus, if the boundary of a field is a straight vertical line, a vertical slit forms between the two different color areas where they meet. For this reason, most kilims can be classed as "slit woven" textiles. The slits are beloved by collectors, as they produce very sharp-etched designs, emphasizing the geometry of the weave. Weaving strategies for avoiding slit formation, such as interlocking, produce a more blurred design image. 

The weft strands, which carry the visible design and color, are almost always wool, whereas the hidden warp strands can be either wool or cotton. The warp strands are only visible at the ends, where they emerge as the fringe. This fringe is usually tied in bunches, to ensure against loosening or unraveling of the weave.

Learn More

Kl MC-1161 Ivory Multi

Price upon request

Kl MC-1161 Ivory Multi


Kilims are produced by tightly interweaving the warp and weft strands of the weave to produce a flat surface with no pile. Kilim weaves are tapestry weaves, technically weft-faced plain weaves, that is, the horizontal weft strands are pulled tightly downward so that they hide the vertical warp strands.

When the end of a color boundary is reached, the weft yarn is wound back from the boundary point. Thus, if the boundary of a field is a straight vertical line, a vertical slit forms between the two different color areas where they meet. For this reason, most kilims can be classed as "slit woven" textiles. The slits are beloved by collectors, as they produce very sharp-etched designs, emphasizing the geometry of the weave. Weaving strategies for avoiding slit formation, such as interlocking, produce a more blurred design image.

The weft strands, which carry the visible design and color, are almost always wool, whereas the hidden warp strands can be either wool or cotton. The warp strands are only visible at the ends, where they emerge as the fringe. This fringe is usually tied in bunches, to ensure against loosening or unraveling of the weave.

Learn More

CD-02 MULTI

Price upon request

CD-02 MULTI


Kilims are produced by tightly interweaving the warp and weft strands of the weave to produce a flat surface with no pile. Kilim weaves are tapestry weaves, technically weft-faced plain weaves, that is, the horizontal weft strands are pulled tightly downward so that they hide the vertical warp strands.

When the end of a color boundary is reached, the weft yarn is wound back from the boundary point. Thus, if the boundary of a field is a straight vertical line, a vertical slit forms between the two different color areas where they meet. For this reason, most kilims can be classed as "slit woven" textiles. The slits are beloved by collectors, as they produce very sharp-etched designs, emphasizing the geometry of the weave. Weaving strategies for avoiding slit formation, such as interlocking, produce a more blurred design image.

The weft strands, which carry the visible design and color, are almost always wool, whereas the hidden warp strands can be either wool or cotton. The warp strands are only visible at the ends, where they emerge as the fringe. This fringe is usually tied in bunches, to ensure against loosening or unraveling of the weave.







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Ar-02 B (Rb-02 Blue Multi)

Price upon request

Ar-02 B (Rb-02 Blue Multi)


Hand loomed rug is traditionally handwoven on a vertical loom with a mounted wrap. They often have no fringes or proper secured ends or sides. The making of them is by pressing strands of fiber together by using thin threading.

The thickness of the rod determines the depth of the pile height. The weaving technique is as such that the designs are limited to certain restrictions. However, they can have a beautiful loop pile, cut pile or a mix of both in them.

Later after the weaving, the rug goes through the process of applying synthetic latex and a cloth sheet to the carpets back to join them together. The latex provides strength to the handloom rug, which saves it from disentangling.






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EM-02 Grey Multi

Price upon request

EM-02 Grey Multi


Kilims are produced by tightly interweaving the warp and weft strands of the weave to produce a flat surface with no pile. Kilim weaves are tapestry weaves, technically weft-faced plain weaves, that is, the horizontal weft strands are pulled tightly downward so that they hide the vertical warp strands.

When the end of a color boundary is reached, the weft yarn is wound back from the boundary point. Thus, if the boundary of a field is a straight vertical line, a vertical slit forms between the two different color areas where they meet. For this reason, most kilims can be classed as "slit woven" textiles. The slits are beloved by collectors, as they produce very sharp-etched designs, emphasizing the geometry of the weave. Weaving strategies for avoiding slit formation, such as interlocking, produce a more blurred design image.

The weft strands, which carry the visible design and color, are almost always wool, whereas the hidden warp strands can be either wool or cotton. The warp strands are only visible at the ends, where they emerge as the fringe. This fringe is usually tied in bunches, to ensure against loosening or unraveling of the weave.

Learn More

EM-01 Blue Multi

Price upon request

EM-01 Blue Multi


Kilims are produced by tightly interweaving the warp and weft strands of the weave to produce a flat surface with no pile. Kilim weaves are tapestry weaves, technically weft-faced plain weaves, that is, the horizontal weft strands are pulled tightly downward so that they hide the vertical warp strands.

When the end of a color boundary is reached, the weft yarn is wound back from the boundary point. Thus, if the boundary of a field is a straight vertical line, a vertical slit forms between the two different color areas where they meet. For this reason, most kilims can be classed as "slit woven" textiles. The slits are beloved by collectors, as they produce very sharp-etched designs, emphasizing the geometry of the weave. Weaving strategies for avoiding slit formation, such as interlocking, produce a more blurred design image.

The weft strands, which carry the visible design and color, are almost always wool, whereas the hidden warp strands can be either wool or cotton. The warp strands are only visible at the ends, where they emerge as the fringe. This fringe is usually tied in bunches, to ensure against loosening or unraveling of the weave.

Learn More

Ar-02 C Beige Blue

Price upon request

Ar-02 C Beige Blue


Hand loomed rug is traditionally handwoven on a vertical loom with a mounted wrap. They often have no fringes or proper secured ends or sides. The making of them is by pressing strands of fiber together by using thin threading.

The thickness of the rod determines the depth of the pile height. The weaving technique is as such that the designs are limited to certain restrictions. However, they can have a beautiful loop pile, cut pile or a mix of both in them.

Later after the weaving, the rug goes through the process of applying synthetic latex and a cloth sheet to the carpets back to join them together. The latex provides strength to the handloom rug, which saves it from disentangling.






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Lt-6(5001,Dp 1450 D)

Price upon request

Lt-6(5001,Dp 1450 D)


Hand loomed rug is traditionally handwoven on a vertical loom with a mounted wrap. They often have no fringes or proper secured ends or sides. The making of them is by pressing strands of fiber together by using thin threading.

The thickness of the rod determines the depth of the pile height. The weaving technique is as such that the designs are limited to certain restrictions. However, they can have a beautiful loop pile, cut pile or a mix of both in them.

Later after the weaving, the rug goes through the process of applying synthetic latex and a cloth sheet to the carpets back to join them together. The latex provides strength to the handloom rug, which saves it from disentangling.


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Lt-07 (Hm-27 A) Ivory Grey

Price upon request

Lt-07 (Hm-27 A) Ivory Grey


Hand loomed rug is traditionally handwoven on a vertical loom with a mounted wrap. They often have no fringes or proper secured ends or sides. The making of them is by pressing strands of fiber together by using thin threading.

The thickness of the rod determines the depth of the pile height. The weaving technique is as such that the designs are limited to certain restrictions. However, they can have a beautiful loop pile, cut pile or a mix of both in them.

Later after the weaving, the rug goes through the process of applying synthetic latex and a cloth sheet to the carpets back to join them together. The latex provides strength to the handloom rug, which saves it from disentangling.






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Mr-08 Ivory Charcoal

1000.00

Mr-08 Ivory Charcoal


Hand loomed rug is traditionally handwoven on a vertical loom with a mounted wrap. They often have no fringes or proper secured ends or sides. The making of them is by pressing strands of fiber together by using thin threading.

The thickness of the rod determines the depth of the pile height. The weaving technique is as such that the designs are limited to certain restrictions. However, they can have a beautiful loop pile, cut pile or a mix of both in them.

Later after the weaving, the rug goes through the process of applying synthetic latex and a cloth sheet to the carpets back to join them together. The latex provides strength to the handloom rug, which saves it from disentangling.





Learn More